Apple Music

Jul. 1st, 2015 09:34 am
bryant: (Abbi)

I’ve bought into the Apple ecosystem, so obviously.

In the interests of testing the scope of music available, I travelled back to the best music critic on the Internet, glenn mcdonald. His final formal music review post is an eloquent exploration of the best music of 2012, ranging from Taylor Swift to European avant garde death metal. It finishes up with a Ylvis song, years before you wondered what the fox says. Bona fides enough.

He has 123 songs on his list. At the time, he constructed playlists on both Spotify and Rdio. Spotify had 93 songs; Rdio had 94. My Apple Music playlist has 96. Pretty much no difference.

It’s seven hours of great music, by the by.

Mirrored from Population: One.

bryant: (play it)

Noted for my own reference:

11/20: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy at One World Theater
12/9: Dave Alvin at the Continental Club
2/4: Los Lobos at One World Theater (opposite OwlCon, hm)
2/29: Dropkick Murphys, Frank Turner at Emo’s East (on sale 11/18)
3/2: Solas at UT Performing Arts Center

Mirrored from Population: One.

bryant: (Default)

Noted for my own reference:

11/20: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy at One World Theater
12/9: Dave Alvin at the Continental Club
2/4: Los Lobos at One World Theater (opposite OwlCon, hm)
2/29: Dropkick Murphys, Frank Turner at Emo’s East (on sale 11/18)
3/2: Solas at UT Performing Arts Center

Mirrored from Population: One.

bryant: (Default)

Even after downloading and playing this I’m still substantially surprised that Richard Thompson found his way onto Rock Band. But it’s awesome!

The fan reaction has also been pretty gratifying. There’s a lot of “it started badly but then I got to the solo, whoa.” It’s weird realizing that this track has the potential to be the top selling Thompson song ever.

My favorite comment on the video: “Is all of that solo really played on a guitar though? Man, I wish mine sounded like that. ;P”

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

bryant: (Default)

Nothin’ ain’t somethin’ till there’s mashup DLC.

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

G’n'R

Oct. 22nd, 2008 10:47 pm
bryant: (Default)

SSC: I’ve been waiting for Chinese Democracy to come out, because I wanted to hear it.

First single (also titled “Chinese Democracy”) is here.

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

bryant: (Default)

The Dark Heresy game outlined here seems to be about to take off. In the interests of screwing around with new ways to manage information, I started a blog for this one rather than a wiki. We’ll see how it goes. I’m offering all the players posting access to the blog.

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

bryant: (Default)

“OK, here’s the plan for the rest of the night. We’re gonna play the next song, then we’re gonna play the fake last song. Then I’m gonna introduce the other guys on the stage, with their Christian name, their nickname, possibly their Zodiac sign, their place of birth, and their surname. Then we’re gonna turn our backs to you and act like we’re off stage for a few moments. Then we’re gonna turn around, pretend to be surprised, and play some more music and then the show will end.”

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

bryant: (Default)

Bob Mould is running a poll on possible models for sales of his music, prompted by Radiohead’s nifty “pay what you want” release. $40 for a yearly subscription to Mould’s music seems like a decent deal to me. Better if you also get access to his back catalog. A lot of people would pay the $40 once and get a massive deal on all the old music, sure, but that’s still sales you might not see otherwise.

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

bryant: (Default)

Richard Thompson’s one of the most depressing lyricists in the world. He’s also one of the artists I admire the most for his skill. In retrospect, a bit of emotion on my part could have been expected, since Susan and I saw him five days after we found out about the Benoit tragedy.

I teared up hard during the first song. You’ve got a viewpoint character singing about bad relationships, you’ve got guitar playing that echoes through the minor keys and embraces atonal harmony as a metaphor for futile rage, and somewhere in there Thompson’s voice has become just about as effective an instrument as his guitar. I think it was cathartic: despite what the world’s lost, life goes on, and talent goes on, and there’s aught yet to admire.

It’d been a while since I’d seen him live; the last time must have been seven or eight years ago. He’s really been pushing his singing skills. He’s more resonant and less gruff than he was back in the 80s by far.

So, yeah: a great concert. Lots of cuts from Sweet Warrior, plus enough older stuff. “Dad’s Gonna Kill Me” is a brutally despairing anti-war song that’d get much more attention in any sane world; and his solo acoustic “1952 Vincent Black Lightning” — bass line plus solos simultaneously, of course — was deeply gratifying. But it was all good.

You can hear the whole concert here. That’s from the DC date of the current tour.

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

bryant: (Default)

EMI’s going to sell all their music online without DRM. It’ll be available through iTunes first; it’ll also cost 30 cents more for a track without DRM, but the quality will be twice as high. If you want to keep the old price, you’ll still be able to get DRM’d tracks for a buck.

Albums will be DRM-free at the same old price. You’ll be able to convert your DRM’d tracks to non-DRM tracks for 30 cents per track.

This is pretty good. Philosophically, I don’t want to pay more for music without the DRM, but since the quality is better I won’t mentally grumble too much. And since I buy most of my music by the album anyway? No big deal.

I should be able to convert full albums to DRM-less at no charge, though.

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibule.

bryant: (Default)

Some geeks build things. A few geeks build things really well. Once upon a time, there was a geek named Tom, an MIT graduate, who worked for Polaroid. He decided he wanted to build a rock and roll band.

So he built Boston, and say what you will, but it’s my opinion that he built the best stadium rock band ever. Boston had the biggest selling debut album and held that record for over ten years, which is not trivial. That doesn’t mean it was great music, but stadium rock isn’t great music. They knew what they were doing.

They: Barry Goudreau, Tom Scholz, and Brad Delp. Cause nah, it wasn’t just Scholz and his magical effects boxes. Goudreau played guitar and wrote songs, and Delp’s voice was pretty much integral to the whole thing. Not that he was a great singer, although he was good, but he had great range and a wonderful harmony and it wouldn’t have been Boston’s soaring overblown overwrought flights of musical excess without him.

All of which is preamble to this: Brad Delp died today, at age 55, in his home in New Hampshire. I am sorely saddened. May he rest in peace.

Originally published at Imaginary Vestibules.

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